Mysterious Facts About The Forbidden City



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1. Constructing History

They built it during the 15th century, from the years 1406–1420.



Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

China had this massive structure of 980 buildings that spans over 180 acres constructed in just 14 years!

It’s a perfect example of Chinese palace architecture and was a massively influential piece of architecture in Eastern Asia.

It became a world heritage site in 1987.

2. How Much Wood

The Forbidden City is the largest collection of preserved ancient wooden structures in the whole world.



Photo: Pixabay.

3. North Star

According to Chinese mythology, the North Star was the home of the Celestial Emperor.



Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

In Chinese, a more literal translation of its name is: “Purple Forbidden City.”

Where does the purple come from? Purple actually refers to the North Star.

According to Chinese mythology, the North Star was the home of the Celestial Emperor.

The “forbidden” comes from the fact that no one could come and go without the Emperor’s permission.

4. Hard at Work

It took over one million workers to build the Forbidden City.



Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

5. Home of a Dynasty

For over 200 years the Ming Dynasty ruled from the Forbidden City.



Photo: Flickr.

After the Ming Dynasty ended, the Qing dynasty moved in. The Forbidden City has been the home to 24 emperors in total.

6. End of an Era

The Forbidden City stopped being the heart of Chinese politics in 1912



Photo: Wikipedia.

when the last Emperor of China, Puyi, gave up his throne.

7. Palace of History

The palace became a museum in 1925



Photo: Pixy.

The palace became a museum in 1925 and still serves that purpose to this day, despite the fact that the museum had to survive some hardships.

The Japanese invasion during WWII forced the Chinese to evacuate the palace collection in an attempt to protect it.
At the end of WWII, they were able to return many of the artifacts and exhibits to the palace museum at the end of the war.

8. Keep Out!

American businesses have popped up in the Forbidden City, which didn’t really thrill the Chinese.



Photo: Wikimedia Commons.

Starbucks opened a location on the grounds in 2000, which sparked controversy—enough that they ended up closing it in 2007.

9. Presidential Dinner

Donald Trump was the first United States President to have a state dinner in the Forbidden City



Photo: Getty Images.

Donald Trump was the first United States President to have a state dinner in the Forbidden City since the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949.

10. Whole Lotta Land

The Forbidden City stretches from 3,153 feet north to south, and 2,470 feet from east to west,



Photo: Flickr.

making one large rectangle. This historic landmark takes up a lot of space.

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